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12% of world population use condoms daily
Trying is BELIEVING

 
 
 
 

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Diabetes Weak Body Heart Problems Stress & Work Pressure

Up to 50% of men and 25% of women may experience some kind of sexual problems or a loss of sexual desire as a result of diabetes.

For men, diabetes can cause damage to the nervous system over a sustained period of time, also known as diabetic neuropathy. One aspect of this is the potential for diabetes to damage the erectile tissue leaving it impossible for a man to achieve or maintain an erection.

Almost 1 in 3 men with diabetes suffer from erectile dysfunction.

A sexual problem, or sexual dysfunction, refers to a problem during any phase of the sexual response cycle that prevents the individual or couple from experiencing satisfaction from the sexual activity. The sexual response cycle has four phases: excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution.

While research suggests that sexual dysfunction is common (43% of women and 31% of men report some degree of difficulty), it is a topic that many people are hesitant to discuss. Fortunately, most cases of sexual dysfunction are treatable, so it is important to share your concerns with your partner and doctor.

Many cardiovascular diseases, especially hypertension and peripheral vascular disease, involve changes to the small blood vessels that supply areas of the body away from the heart, such as the legs, feet and genitals. Poor blood flow to the penis or vagina can impact a personís ability to become aroused and engage in sexual intercourse. Some studies suggest that 30 percent to 50 percent of cases of erectile dysfunction (the inability to achieve or maintain an erection suitable for intercourse) are the result of blood vessel disease.

Further, any medical condition that causes a general feeling of weakness and disability has the potential to decrease sexual desire and performance.

Did you know that stress can also affect your sex life? If ignored, stress can completely derail your libido and sexual response. To figure out how to combat stress, you first have to understand the purpose of stress ó and there is a very good one! For early humankind, stress was a lifesaver. When our ancestors were in danger, stress ignited the fight-or-flight response, which helped keep them safe from threats such as wild animals.

In modern times, however, stress is generally the result of having too much to do and too little time to do it in, problems at work, and struggles within families.

 
 

Bill Gates pledges to reinvent condom
Gates wants geeks to build a better condom
Bill Gates wants to give the world a better condom

 Bill Gates condom; Bill Gates is putting out a call to inventors, but he's not looking for software, or the latest high-tech gadget. This time he's in search of a better condom.

On its Grand Challenges website, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is offering a $100,000 startup grant to the person who designs "the next generation condom that significantly preserves or enhances pleasure" and promotes "regular use." It may sound like the setup for a joke, but the goal is deadly serious. While researchers call condoms one of the best ways to stop the spread of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, getting people to use them is another story.


The foundation wants to see something that will lead men and women outside of a committed relationship to stop and think twice before having unprotected sex. The startup grant could lead to $1 million in further funding.

"Male condoms are cheap, easy to manufacture, easy to distribute, and available globally, including in resource-poor settings, through numerous well-developed distribution channels," the foundation says. Nevertheless, many people are reluctant to use them because they complain that prophylactics interfere with pleasure and intimacy. This creates "a trade-off that many men find unacceptable," the foundation notes.

Contraception, by the numbers
In some places and cultures, condom use is often seen as a sign that a man has AIDS, and many women won't sleep with such men. Female condoms are even more difficult to use and women are often afraid to suggest using them.

"Any advance or new design that gets people to use condoms would be a big plus," Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and one of the world's leading AIDS researchers, said in an interview with CNN. He says great strides have been made in treating HIV infection in Africa, but for every person who is treated two more become newly infected.

The numbers are indeed startling: 34 million people in the world are living with HIV, according the 2012 UNAIDS World AIDS Day Report. About half of them don't know they're infected, according to Fauci.

That problem exists in the U.S. as well, particularly in minority communities.
"Although African-Americans comprise 12% of the population, they account for 45% of all new HIV infections nationwide and 65% of all new infections among women," Fauci said previously. "A substantial portion of newly infected African-Americans are bisexual and homosexual men."
The Gates Foundation hopes that "new concept designs with new materials can be prototyped and tested quickly."
"Large-scale human clinical trials are not required," it adds. "Manufacturing capacity, marketing, and distribution channels are already in place."
But building a better condom may not be as easy as it seems. Some sources say the first recorded use of a condom-like sheath was in Egypt in 1350 B.C., and people have been complaining about it -- and trying to improve on it -- ever since.

 

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